Tag Archives: youtube

Learning Language Like A Baby

IMG_1004.JPGLearning a language is easier than people think. Just look at yourself now, you are reading an article written in English by someone probably very very far away from where you are. You most likely learnt this language as a young baby – as your native tongue – or perhaps you learnt the language later in life.

Baby Amy
Me as a baby

Regardless of whether it’s your first, second or sixth language, it got in there. The hard part about learning a language is the getting around your own mind to allow it in. Most of us learnt a language growing up that serves to comminicate with our community in both a written and spoken form (however, some are not so lucky, due to physical or psychological issues) We learn it as we grow for one reason: survival. If we want to get fed, we have to communicate that we are hungry. If we are scared, we need to be able to explain the danger that is facing us.
As a baby, your parents were probably quite good at understanding the babblings and cooings you made as a kind of personalised pre-language to know when you were hungry, sleepy, scared or needed changing. Parents and guardians are very good at picking up on the needs of the people in their care. But you had to be able to communicate better. If you wanted one of the toys in front of you, it would help you acheive getting it if you said ‘Ball’ or ‘truck’, so the listener would know exactly what you wanted.
You aquired language as a necessity for your survival, pleasure and comfort.
Learning a second language requires a bit more work as we try so hard to learn it through our first language. It is very normal to say “What is this in English?” or “So ‘____’ is just like ‘___’ in English?”
When it is a language that is similar to your langage it is okay, but when it is two entirely different languages it gets confusing. One of the biggest problems I am finding in learning Korean and Japanese is that it is so hard to learn it through the context of English, because they are so vastly different. At times, I even find it a lot easier to learn Korean through Japanese, because they are at least slighty similar.
When you were a baby, the only way you could work out what something meant was through context. You would see and hear how it was used and learn from that.
A Korean baby can’t hear the word “비행기” and think “I think that’s Korean for ‘airplane’.” But they hear it said, maybe the parent points at a toy plane or a picture of a plane as they say it and the child will eventually put two and two together.
It can be a slow process, but it’s the best proven method to make you both natural and comfortable in that language – It made you fluent in your native language!
I know it is incredibly tough to learn another language without referencing your native language, but there are a couple of ways that you can try to work around your native tongue.

 

Go Sub-free

Copyright (C) SBS
Copyright (C) SBS

It’s so easy to watch television programs in the language you are studying and always have the subtitles on. It’s the safer and easier option which means you can take everything in as easily as if you were watching a show from your home.
But, you can find that you’ve watched an entire series and barely looked up from the words on the screen!
I love watching Japanese and Korean dramas without subtitles because I can really watch the performances and it’s a great way to test what I know and try to figure out the stuff I don’t know from other sources (i.e how it’s said, the context of the scene and the relationship between the speaker and listener).
It can be tough and you may miss some details, but it really does help (and gives you an excuse to watch it again later)!
Sometimes, as you improve, you will also find ways that the subtitle writers didn’t get it totally right or misunderstood and you can get an even clearer understanding of what the character is saying. I remember watching a Japanese drama where the subtitles consistantly made a mistake that confused me for ages until I watched it without, actually listened to the actual Japanese dialogue and suddenly it all made sense!

Stick to it

sticky note 1One method I use is to put up sticky notes around my bedroom and office space that have words in Japanese and/or Korean that have pictures to describe what the word or phrase means! I don’t put a single word of English on it so that I learn to recognise and appreciate it in that language. It’s a bit like pictionary, if you think about it!

sticky note 2Try to leave sticky notes or flashcards around for yourself so you learn to recognise them with ease. If you’re feeling tricky as you boost the difficulty, perhaps write a description of what the word or phrase means IN the language you’re learning. If you have friends who speak that language fluently, get them to write some of the words and answers for you so that 1) you can’t cheat (because, if you wrote it, you might remember it) and 2) you’ll know for sure that it’s right!

Read it and weep (or don’t weep)

Try buying a book in the language of your choice. Try reading a bit of it from time to time and see how much of it you understand or just try to look at the grammar and sentence structure to get a better understanding of that. Reading an original book in the language will give you a good feeling for how it is consumed on a day-to-day basis and help you really immerse yourself. Don’t worry if the book makes absolutely NO sense to begin with, just keep studying and soon enough you’ll start to pick stuff up.
I bought myself a book of Korean poetry (which was a difficult first choice) and I’m finding with time that I can pick out more and more that I understand. I’ve got a long way to go, but it really helps to have that as a marker of where I’m up to!

Take it social

Again, the more you immerse yourself the more comfortable around the language you will become. I try to make myself unescapably surrounded by all of the languages I am trying to learn – and that includes online too!
On Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, I try my best to keep my exposure to language high. I’ll follow Korean and Japanese people on Instagram and Twitter and try my best to read their messages. Interacting with people is great because it’s a perfect opportunity to test your written knowledge and try have a chat with people.
(Of course, always be careful of who you talk to online. There are creeps everywhere and in every language, so always use your common sense when talking to strangers)
I always keep my ‘Trending Topics’ bar on Twitter set to either Japanese or Korean and I’ll make sure that every time I check Twitter that I am reading every trending topic.
On Facebook, I follow the Korean Huffinton Post, Korean stores like G Market and Retrip (a Japanese online magazine) which is great for a casual glance over the news and makes a nice buffer between quizzes and stressed-out revision statuses!

Listen up

Listening to audiobooks, like reading, gives you a subtitle-free and pure exposure to a text but also has the added benefit of being able to hear clear pronunciation, often totally uninterrupted by noisy surroundings or music that you would find in at TV show or movie.
There is a huge wealth of audiobooks available online, so have a look around and have a listen!
I’m currently listening to the Korean radio play adaptation of Don Quichotte by SBS that is available to listen to on Youtube!

I hope this piece is helpful to you! If you have any questions, please share them in the comments or over on Facebook or Twitter! Xx

Bigger and better: Expanding Learn With Amy

lwa photo tagHey, guys! It’s been a few days since my last post, so I just wanted to give you all a quick update as to what’s going on with things.

I have just had some really good news – I have just been promoted (again) at the restaurant I work at, and I will start my new position when we re-open in January. We’re closing up for Christmas on the 23rd and I only have one day off before then, so I might not get to post a LOT before Christmas, but I will be posting as much as possible over my holiday time and making big plans for the website, that will come into effect in the early months of 2015.

So, I wanted to share some of the announcements for the site with you all:

Firstly, we are indeed expanding onto Youtube!

I’ve had a few people asking if I would be making videos, and I am very pleased to say that I will be doing so and that as many posts as possible will be paired with a video to match! So that is the plan.

In answer to a few people asking, I am not entirely sure whether I will start vlogging. I’m not sure that my life is interesting enough to vlog and, with work, there isn’t an awful lot to vlog about. If an interesting event comes up that seems worth recording, I’ll consider vlogging it.

 

Learn with Amy books!

To help aid in learning, I’ve decided that Learn With Amy will expand into books and other learning materials. These will include books for adults and children as well as workbooks and courses.

 

We are also opening a store!

No, not a real-life store (yet), but the website will grow to include an online store where you can buy Learn With Amy books, clothes and personalised and custom things designed by me.

 

The website’s getting a makeover

The website, still with its little downy baby feathers, is going to be getting a makeover and will have a bright, stylish new look.

This might cause some technical difficulties as we work out the kinds and add all the new features, but we’ll make sure any problems are fixed as soon as possible.

 

Collaboration!

I’m planning to collaborate with number of online content creators and hopefully organise interviews with some exciting people! I’ll keep you updated on this as much as possible!

 

Comics

You already know my KPotD (Korean Phrase of the Day), but I’m expanding into a wider range of comics very soon! I’m going to be playing around with some ideas and trying some styles out, so any feedback and opinions are very welcome!

 

This is a lot of exciting news and I’ll be working very hard to get this all rolling, as well as settling into my new position in my workplace, so bear with while I get Learn With Amy to its next step in its growth.

So let’s make 2015 great together!

As ever, feel free to contact me using the contact form below, leave a comment or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! Xx

Making 호박죽 (Korean butternut squash rice porridge) and Discovering Maangchi!

butternutIn Korea, 죽 ‘juk’ dishes are savoury porridges made from rice. Some are the same consistency of porridge or oatmeal, while others are more like soup with dumplings of rice. Juk is a popular comfort food in Korea and is commonly eaten when ill as it is simple and easy on the stomach, but tasty and good for the body.

While Juk is usually homemade, you can easily buy instant mix in Korea – however, it is incredibly salty!! It is best served warm, but most dishes can be enjoyed cold.

 

My first experiences of ‘juk’ were packets of instant 소고기죽 (Beef porridge) and, while saltier than a mouthful of seawater, was really nice! I’d never had any experience of savoury porridge before, so it was very new to me. When I started making it, I was dubious that the mix would even work. It seemed too small a quantity and too fine to expand into anything substantial, but sure enough it worked! This made me curious about how hard it could be to make it myself.

Being a big fan of butternut squash, I was so happy when I saw a recipe online for 호박죽. But this rice porridge was different from the one I tried. Instead of being an oatmeal-y mix, it seemed to be a kind of soup with dumplings. But, instead of suit, wheat flour and herbs, these dumplings were made of just sweet rice flour, water and a pinch of salt!

It’s so simple, but SO good

The recipe I used came from a lovely website and Youtube channel called Maangchi, which teaches a wide array of Korean recipes.

©Maangchi
©Maangchi

Maangchi is funny, cute, an incredibly talented cook and beautiful (inside and out). Her videos and articles sharing her recipes are clear and fun to make – and all delivered with charisma and a unique sparkle!

 

After one try, the 호박죽 turned out perfectly. And I can see why it is considered such a good comfort food! It’s so wholesome, yet simple! It’s not too rich, yet it’s so satisfying.

And Maangchi has literally hundreds of other fantastic recipes to try, including:

Roast Seaweed snacks

Korean style fried chicken

And Jjajangmyeon (짜장면)

After the brilliant success of the 호박죽, I will definitely be trying as many of her recipes as I can!

Make sure to subscribe to Maangchi, as well as follow her on Facebook, Twitter and Flickr.

Have you tried any of Maangchi’s dishes? Share photos with us on the Learn With Amy Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and make sure to tag Maangchi so she can see your handiwork!

Good luck!

Meet Yerin and Yeseo! Does Yebin have competition?!

 

©Youtube/Drama Fever

 

It seems like the whole internet is going mad for the gorgeous little cutie Yebin, who’s character and innocent charm keeps us hooked video after video. But it seems like little ‘baby Yebin’ may have some competition on her hands!

Thanks to the brilliance that is Youtube’s ‘suggested videos’ bar, I stumbled across a channel for two little Korean girls Yerin and Yeseo, run by their adoring father.                                                 ©Youtube/Drama Fever

The first video I saw was from 3 years ago of the elder girl, Yerin, battling between the joy of looking at her mother and her sleepiness.

The two sisters are so adorable and are absolute rays of light, clearly cherished by their parents. Their parents said that the aim of the channel was to “share the joy that my little girls brought to my life”. Mission accomplished!

One particular video had me near tears with cuteness, was this one:

(The older sister, Yerin, is saying “고맙습니다”/“Thank you” to her parents for the ice cream. However, the younger, Yeseo, is still very young and has difficulty saying it, so just chimes in at “다” with her sister.)

So, Yebin isn’t the only cutie on the block!

 

There is also a cute meaning to the name ‘Bobaepapa’, as ‘Bobae’ (보배) means ‘treasure’ in Korean. So cute!

Be sure to follow ‘Bobaepapa’ on Youtube, Twitter and Instagram as well as joining their fan club on Facebook and follow their blog!

 

Let me know what you think of this post. Send me a message using the contact form below, or connect with me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram! X

 

Happy Halloween! How to have a safe Halloween!

10748868_717444431673566_657748307_nI hope you are all having a very happy Halloween!

I’ll be working away at the restaurant tonight — portraying the terrifying character of an exhausted waitress (whoooooooo, scary!) — so I won’t get to join the usual spooky celebrations, but I wanted to wish you all a very fun and safe Halloween!

 

Here are a quick few tips on how to make the best of your Halloween:

Lights on, lights off

I know Halloween is all about scares, and who isn’t at least a little creeped out by the dark? While you’re using the dark to set the atmosphere, be careful to make sure that the area is clear of any trip hazards, and try to have some torches on hand. (also, I recommend that stairs and steps stay lit, as no-one wants real accidents on Halloween)

 

Plan ahead

If you’re going trick-or-treating or to any Halloween parties, plan ahead your route and make sure you know where you’re going. Remember, on a night where everyone is wearing masks, it’s even harder to know who’s behind them.

 

Keep your wits

If something feels wrong, don’t just brush it off. Always keep your instincts with you and remember that safety comes first. If you don’t trust someone you are with, feel safe or have any worries, handle the situation as smoothly and calmly as you can– Don’t ignore it for the sake of a party.

 

Tamper-proofing

Free sweets, free food, free drinks! On a night with so much food and drink being passed around, there comes some risks. Don’t eat or drink anything that you think has been tampered with and just kindly decline. We’ve all heard the stories, we don’t want to live them.

 

Dress accordingly

Sure, you want to be a ‘sexy ghost’, but it’s still October and it’s still cold. Try to take warm clothes with you and avoid getting chilled. It can seriously spoil the authentic look of your costume if you’re shivering and sneezing all night!

 

Have safe fun

On nights where people often let go of their cares and senses to go have fun, a lot of stuff can happen that can ruin the fun. No-one wants to end a ‘fun’ night crying, scared or in the emergency room, so make sure your fun takes safety into account. That way, you can keep enjoying your night and future fun times to come without the burden of worry or upset!

 

10745084_717444415006901_1988275491_nHave a great night guys! Have any great pics from your Halloween parties? Come share them on the Learn With Amy Facebook and Twitter and come connect with me on Twitter and Instagram! Have a fun and spooky night! Bwahahahahahaha!

Pancake art?!?!?!?!

photo 4I never knew it was a thing before… But now it is, I feel more contented.

 

So, people make art out of a lot of different stuff. Paint… Garbage… Blue tac… Even themselves! But pancake art is a new one to me!

Youtuber Nathan Shields uploads videos of his work, straight from the pan, to his following of over 13,000 (drooling) fans.

Armed with only a hot pan, a spatula and a squirty bottle of pancake batter, Nathan ‘paints’ amazingly realistic imaged in pancake, resulting in possibly the coolest breakfasts known to man.

His videos include ‘Olaf’ from the hit Disney movie ‘Frozen’

 

A skull

 

And even 3 characters from AMC’s The Walking Dead!!

 

 

As well as videos of making the pancakes, Nathan also makes cute tutorials with his two incredibly cute kids Gryphon and Alice, who both can’t get enough of the fun.

Be sure to like and subscribe to Nathan’s videos, so you can keep up with his creative works of delicious art!

 

Maybe you can use Learn With Amy’s Pancake Recipe to make your own edible art!

Let us know what you think in the comment section below! Have you tried making these yourself? Let us know how it went!

All the best, guys! X

How to Read Hangul!

So, I’ll be uploading a lot of Korean lessons and dialogues for you guys, but I first wanted to teach you how to read Hangul, the Korean writing system, so that you know it and can progress with the lessons. Personally, I have never been great at reading the Romanized Korean and think it’s way simpler to just learn Hangul so if you learn it sooner, it’s better for you.

It looks quite scary to start with but once you have it down you’ll be just fine! And, seriously, it doesn’t actually take as long to learn as you think – I learnt it in like 6 hours!

Quick note: You’ve probably noticed from looking at Korean words that they don’t write stuff out in a long string of characters like we do. Instead of the string of letters we use in English, Korean characters are stacked into syllables. Take the informal casual word for thank you: Gomawo.
As you can see, in English it’s a string of letters g-o-m-a-w-o. But, in Korean, it’s broken in to syllables and then the characters are stacked to match. So gomawo becomes go-ma-wo or 고마워.

First things first!
In Korean, syllables always begin with a consonant! If a syllable begins with a vowel then the character ㅇ、which looks like an o with a stem at the top, and the vowel goes to the right or below it.
And remember that there’s always at least one consonant and one vowel to every syllable.
Consonants!

ㄱ [g/k]
ㄱ is spoken like a g sound, however it’s a ‘harder’ sound so it sounds like a mix between g and k.

ㄴ [n]
This n sound is a lot like the sound for ‘nose’, ‘never’ or ‘nope’. However, one important difference is tongue placement. In English when making the ‘n’ sound we often put our tongue to the roof of our mouth, just behind the front teeth. But, in Korean, you should put your tongue between your front teeth – almost like biting your tongue.

ㄷ [t, d]
This sound is kind of a mix between a ‘t’ and a ‘d’ sound. With the sound 다, it is pronounces almost like ‘tda’ with a very subtle ‘t’ sound before the ‘d’.

ㄹ [l/r]
This one’s a little tricky as it’s sometimes ‘l’, sometimes ‘r’ and often a mixture of the two.
For example, 2 in Korean is 일 ‘il’. That’s pronounced like ‘l’.
However, one common particle you will use in Korean is ‘를’, which is pronounced like ‘reul’

ㅁ [m]
This one is simply just a ‘m’ sound.

ㅂ [b, p]
This is said like softer ‘b’ sound. Think of the common Korean word ‘오빠’ it is written in Romanized Korean as ‘oppa’, when it is more of a softer ‘b’ than a regular ‘p’. Soften your be and you’ve got it!

ㅅ [s, sh]
This one changes depending what other characters it is combined with, but you will naturally pick it up as you listen to more spoken Korean (get watching those dramas!)
For example 사 and 소 are pronounced ‘sa’ and ‘so’ (a soft ‘o’, like in ‘sorry’), but 샤 and 쇼 sound like ‘sha’ and ‘sho’. You’ll naturally get a hang of the pronunciation with time, so don’t fret too much over it.

ㅇ [silent]
This is an interesting character, because if it comes at the beginning of a syllable, it is silent. It is only paired with a vowel for grammatical purposes and doesn’t make a sound.
The only time ㅇ makes a sound is if it is at the end of a syllable. When placed at the end of a syllable, ㅇ makes the ‘ng’ sound.
For example, the word 응 uses ㅇ in both ways. The first one is used to allow the vowel ㅡ to make a sound (‘uh’), while the second one adds the ‘ng’ sound on the end making the word ‘ung’ (This is a very informal word used to say yes, to convey interest or to say like “Go on”, to show you’ve realised something or when hanging up the phone. This is bit of a tricky word and you need to know how to use if- if you want to know more here’s a link to the Youtuber ‘ChoNunMigookSaram’ talking about the word 응)

ㅈ [j, ch]
This character sounds like a hard ‘j’ or a softer ‘ch’ sound, depending on what characters it is partnered with.
For example, 자 and 저 are pronounced quite differently. The first one if ‘Ja’ while the second one sounds more like ‘cho’.
I know these changing sounds can be quite confusing at first, but with regular listening you will naturally start to pick up on the differences quickly!

ㅊ [ch]
While the last character was a little dubious whether it made a ‘j’ or a ‘ch’ sound, this character is a lot simpler – It’s just a stronger ‘ch’ sound than before.

ㅋ [k]
Is like ‘ㄱ’, but instead of being a soft k, it’s a hard ‘k’ sound.
So, while 기 is like ‘gi’, 키 is ‘ki’.

ㅌ [t]
Remember ㄷ? Well this is the same again, but this time it makes a strong ‘t’ sound.
In Korean, the word for note is 노트 “No-tu”. And the reason it’s ㅌ instead of ㄷ is because ㅌ is a hard T sound.

ㅍ [p]
This is like ㅂ, but this time it is a hard ‘p’ sound (sorry, that sounds dirty XD)

ㅎ [h]
This one is very easy as this sound doesn’t change much with different words and uses. This one is, quite simply, just the usual ‘h’ sound that we are very used to already in English.

Vowels!
아 [a]
This vowel makes the sound ‘a’, like ‘and’ or ‘harp’. Say it like ‘ahh’ rather than ‘ay’ or ‘ar’, as it’s quite a soft breathy sound.

  • 야 This is just like 아/a, but the addition of another stroke makes it ‘ya’

 

어 [eo]
This particular one used to catch me out all the time as the Romanization is really deceptive, in that it leads us to think that we are supposed to be making an “ee-oh” sound, when it’s really more of an “uh”.
The proper use of this one is one that you will naturally become more comfortable with as you listen, read and speak more Korean.

  • 여 is like 야, as in that the additional stroke adds a ‘y’ onto the beginning.

So 어/eo becomes 여/yeo (pronounced ‘yuh’)

우 [u]

This one can be one of the trickier to pronounce as it’s so tempting to fall into the trap of pronouncing it as “oo” (like “moo”). It is a little like the “oo” sound, except it is cut short. Listen to the pronunciation of the work “Hanguk” (Korea) and listen to the short “u” sound. You’re aiming for that kind of clipped sound.

  • Add another stoke and 우 becomes 유/yu!

오 [o]
This character makes an ‘o’ sound. It’s not a long sound, but quite a clipped ‘o’.

  • Again with the last three, adding an extra stroke to 오 makes it 요/yo.

으 [oo]
Like 오 this character does make and ‘o’ sound, but it is elongated and pronounced more like ‘oo’.
Unlike the others, this one does not change with the addition of another line (In circumstances that you would need that, I believe 유 would suffice)

And finally

이 [i]
This one is nice and simple. It’s just an ‘ee’ sound. Possible the easiest one there is, 이 just so similar to I in English, that there’s not much to get confused over!

I hope you’ve found this piece helpful in learning Hangul.
If you have any further comments, questions (or corrections), message me using the form below and I’ll get back to you!
감사합니다~!

Meet Anna: Charismatic, fearless and truly kick-ass

 

©Anna Akana/Youtube
©Anna Akana/Youtube

Anna Akana, is an actress, filmmaker, youtuber and possibly one of the coolest women online. One of her latest videos, “How to put on your face”, is going viral online as she spreads the messages of confidence, health and inner beauty.

She’s confident, intelligent, geeky, educational, honest, creative, friendly, so beautifully open – AND HILARIOUS!
Anna’s videos are well thought out, relatable and addictive (and from a filmmaker’s perspective – oh my damn, she’s a fantastic filmmaker!!)

As well as making a ton of fun and creative videos, Anna is also on a mission to create 12 short films in 2014 before making a feature film. This is a lady who understands and respects the process of learning and earning your stripes!
This geeky, cat-loving video goddess is captivating to the audiences and I totally love her open and fearless style.
In her video “How to deal with sexual harassment” she cleverly and humorously tackles the very common issue of sexual harassment in a manner which makes the viewer feel safe, comfortable and enlightened.

 

While in her video “Pregnapocalypse” she plays out a brief scenario of what would happen if every woman in the world was suddenly 9 months pregnant (trust me, you won’t be expecting the twist)

She even did a very helpful video about money in filmmaking to share with people that might not know where the money goes in filmmaking. Is there anything she can’t do?!

She even has quite the “Overactive imagination” (I just needed to squeeze this one in because I love it so much)

Seriously, how can one woman be just so awesome? It’s amazing!
I’m really looking forward to watching Anna’s journey and supporting her work (heck, if she decides to go the crowd-funding route, I’m in!) I plan on sharing any big news she breaks in future (kickstarter plz) and I’m really excited to see what she brings out next.
Stay awesome, Anna!

If you liked this, please keep coming back for more. I love sharing new content and people for you all to enjoy and there will be more people posts like this too. (Also, if you are a youtube content creator who thinks their work deserves some love, send me a message on the contact form here and I’ll take a look at your stuff!)
On social media? Come say hi to us on Facebook and Twitter! You can also come catch up with me on my personal Twitter and Instagram! 추!

Cutest Korean Lessons Ever!

There are a couple videos doing the rounds around the internet at the minute of a little girl’s incredibly adorable reactions as her mother tries to teach her Korean and some valuable life lessons. This little cutie’s name is Yebin (예빈), a 2 years old from Korea whose her mother loves to capture her little girl’s adorableness on camera. Source: Drama Fever AND! These videos actually serve a good purpose in learning Korean, as it is often very helpful to hear a child learning a language to help your own. Not only does the mother’s clear pronunciation help us hear, but children often repeat things to help them learn, so we get the benefit of hearing it repeated a few times – and when it’s as cute as that how can we not remember?!

New Picturearticle-2581610-1C50E8A500000578-739_634x773

After seeing a couple of her videos around the internet, I decided to find out where these videos were coming from. Turns out Yebin’s loving mother runs a facebook page for her daughter, where she posts pictures and videos of her super cute daughter, so other people can watch and go crazy over how adorable she is. For more pics and videos of little Yebin, check out her Facebook!

What do you think of this little cutie pie? Come and squee about her in the comments, or come tweet or Facebook us!